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BTHDT
When sightseeing, there’s an important architectural feature very few people ever notice - the FLOOR. When earthquakes struck ancient Greece and Rome, walls and roofs crumbled, but the one thing that survived from Delos to Herculaneum to Pompeii were the mosaic floors. Many mosaics have such fine workmanship that you’d think they’re paintings.

Published in January - February

BTHDT
There are many great palaces near Paris, just a day-trip away. However, if you want to see a completely furnished French palace, you must visit the Palace of Compiegne. Compiegne is so “undiscovered” that the official website is in French. Compiegne’s history ties in to Versailles and even Vienna’s elegant Schoenbrunn Palace. It was the meeting place of Europe’s royalty.

Published in November - December

BTHDT Potsdam
The great town of Potsdam (near Berlin) has numerous palaces built over many centuries. The most famous Potsdam Palace is Sanssouci, Frederick the Great’s 18th-century Rococo “Pleasure Palace.”  The translation of “Sanssouci” does homage to its purpose, “Without a care.” It rises on terraced vines which from a distance look more like a cascading fountained-formal garden. While it’s delicately magnificent, it’s only a delightful appetizer to much grander, more historic and more substantial palaces scattered throughout massive Potsdam Park, worthy of a entire day’s exploration.

 

Published in September - October

BTHDT Garden-Palazzo
In Rome’s Borghese Gallery (paraphrasing T.S. Elliott) men and women come and go seeking out Michelangelo and other great masters of painting and sculpture. Visitors enter and exit through the front, without even bothering to walk around the entire building, and miss three unique formal gardens. That’s a shame. Visitors miss an aviary on one side. But above all they miss a magnificent rear-formal garden with fountain and statues (as seen in Three Coins in the Fountain), which is a great place to rest.  

Published in September - October

BEENTHERE
Having visited hundreds of cities on six continents, I have my favorite hotels in each city. Sure, I’d like to keep staying at my favorite hotel whenever I return to that city. However, I’m a creature of discovery over a creature of comfort. Instead, I make it my business to stay at a hotel that’s new to me, in an entirely different neighborhood of the revisited city. By choosing a different hotel in a different neighborhood, you’ll get to explore sites you might otherwise have missed. Here are a few examples:

Published in July - August

barry.goldsmith
In Florida, eschew the Magic Kingdom for a city whose history is part of two real kingdoms, Spain and Great Britain. St. Augustine showcases America’s Spanish and British Colonial Pasts - and even the past of Imperial France. Napoleon Bonaparte’s nephew, Prince Charles Louis Napoleon Achille Murat, lived in St. Augustine’s “Murat House.”

Published in May - June

BTHDT Europe
My favorite castle in the Czech Republic is Konopiste, a few miles outside Prague. Too many guidebooks warn visitors if they support animal rights to avoid Konopiste. Agreed that its thousands of displayed antlers and taxidermied animals are repulsive, but homes of many great hunters (such as Teddy Roosevelt’s Sagamore Hill) also reflect their owners’ greatness.

Published in March - April

BTHDT-Budapest
Budapest has long been a magnet for Jewish Tours. American-Jewish tourists staying at Budapest’s Four Seasons Hotel or the renowned landmark Gellert Hotel & Spa make a beeline to see Europe’s largest synagogue, the majestic Dohany Synagogue. Here’s the irony. The Dohany Synagogue wasn’t even built by a Jew - but those two world-class hotels were!

Published in January - February

BTHDT-Czech
I recently took an organized commercial day trip with Gray Line Tours (www.grayline.com) to two great Czech spa towns, Karlovy Vary (Karlsbad) and Marianske Lazne  (Marienbad). And I’m glad I did it on a tour rather than by myself via public transportation because there is a lack of convenient connections between those two great towns.

Published in January - February

BT-1
Everywhere you go in Italy you see towels, cups, calendars and especially fridge magnets with the ubiquitous image of Raphael’s two devilish angels. Someone on my last Rome tour asked me to take them to the museum to see the original angels. My reply? Okay, after we’ re finishing touring Rome, let’s go to Dresden.

Published in November - December
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